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Brisbane's newest pedestrian bridge starts to take shape

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The Neville Bonner pedestrian bridge that will link South Bank with the new Queens Wharf development has reached a major milestone, with a 120 tonne concrete pile cap now erected in the middle of the Brisbane River.

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The structure will be a central support for the bridge, with its location now giving people a good idea of the link it will take across the river.

The pile cap was transported in two halves on a large barge under tugboat control before they were lifted to bridge contractor Fitzgerald Constructions’ Darwin barge.

The pile cap will be sealed, dewatered and filled with steel reinforcement before 230 cubic metres of concrete will be poured to lock it into place.

With the piles in place, the next step, expected within weeks, is for the pre-constructed bridge decking to make its way down the Brisbane River to be lifted into position.

The bridge is part of the $3.6 billion Queens Wharf casino development, currently being built by the Destination Brisbane consortium.

Project Manager Glenn Bourner said he was excited to see the pile cap being constructed as it provided a visible proof point of the bridge’s progress.

“The pile cap is a sizeable piece of concrete in the Brisbane River and will allow people to start connecting the dots for where this bridge will connect,” he said.

Bourner – who was also the project manager for the Kurilpa Bridge, the last bridge built in Brisbane more than a decade ago – said the new span’s design had been refined a number of times through extensive modelling of aerodynamic and wind tunnel testing to make sure movement was kept to a minimum.

The Neville Bonner Bridge, named in honour of the late Queensland senator who was the first Aboriginal Australian to become a member of the Parliament of Australia, is expected to open late next year.

It will be one of several pedestrian or “green” bridges set to be built at various locations across the river over the next five years.

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