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Cheers to that: Small family winery wins Qld Wine of the Year

Culture

Despite the Ekka being cancelled, the Royal Queensland Food and Wine Show (RQFWS) has forged ahead, in the process giving a family-owned Granite Belt winery a massive leg-up.

 

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Girraween Estate is a small, family-owned winery located in the Granite Belt run by Steve and Lisa Messiter that typically only makes 10,000 bottles a year – but its fortunes have been turned around by having its 2019 Cabernet Sauvignon named as the state’s Wine of the Year.

Now their award-winning red will be promoted by Treasury Brisbane and available at their riverside restaurant Will and Flow. 

Queensland Wine of the Year is awarded to the best wine grown solely from Queensland grapes.

Girraween Estate owner and winemaker Steve Messiter said he was honoured to receive the accolade and was looking forward to exposing his now award-winning red to more wine drinkers.

“As a small winery we only make about 10,000 bottles a year and sell most of those through our cellar door,” Messiter said.

“We thought the 2019 Cabernet Sauvignon was a great wine, so to be recognised as the best by such experienced wine judges in such difficult circumstances is a thrill and validates all of our hard work.

“It’s a medium bodied, fruit-driven wine, with lovely red berry and blackcurrant flavours and I’m excited to have more people try it. I hope everyone that who does loves it,” he said.

RNA Chief Executive Brendan Christou said it was wonderful that Queensland producers are being recognised for their excellence as part of the RNA’s prestigious RQFWS.

“Our charter is to champion and celebrate the essential role agriculture plays in our everyday lives and recognise the best of the best,’’ he said.

“It’s great the public will get to enjoy this award-winning Queensland wine for the next three months together with providing Girraween Estate with invaluable promotion.’’

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