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Good vibrations: Slattery brings in the big money to back FiberSense

Business

Tech entrepreneur Bevan Slattery has lured some of Australia’s corporate heavyweights to his latest corporate play, FiberSense, a company he said had an extraordinary platform.

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Reports today said the company chaired by Slattery had recently raised $11 million from Series A financing, which generally follows the initial seed funding.

An ASX listing of the company was also expected.

The funders who came on board included Craig Scroggie who heads up Brisbane data centre company, NEXTDC, which Slattery founded, but also Uniti Group’s Vaughan Brown and Kogan’s Ruslan Kogan.

An AFR report said Icon Cancer Care’s founder Stuart Giles was also on board as well as Goldman Sachs boss Simon Rothery, investor Jordan Grives and Colinton Capital’s Simon Moore.

FiberSense is delivering what it claims is a new digital platform using vibration detection and ranging sensor technology. It will deliver a service that it claims will bridge the digital and physical world and uses an example of being able to warn a pedestrian of a speeding car approaching them.

Slattery today posted that FiberSense was definitely not his but that of founder Mark Englund.

“Us old guys are here to make sure an amazing and the most extraordinary platform I have ever seen goes truly global,” Slattery said.

“(It’s) going to be an amazing ride and so humbling to be with the “A” team together for the journey.”

FiberSense uses a platform called SuperSoniQ which it said was designed to dramatically improve the experience of interacting and moving through public spaces.

There have also been reports that the platform can predict to an accuracy of 99.998 per cent, what is about to happen on a road. Testing has been done in Sydney and Singapore and the big benefit for the company would be through the development of driverless cars.

The technology was developed by Mark Englund and essentially uses fibre to detect vibrations.

“Public spaces are increasingly full of unpleasant experiences and unexpected events that could be avoided or removed entirely if you had the ability to expand your awareness of the public spaces that are relevant to you or your responsibilities,” the company said.

Slattery also earlier this year bought a stake in rent.com.au and launched HyperOne, a project to develop a $1.5 billion national fibre network.

 

 

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